Physical health & nutrition1

When you have cancer, every activity can feel like a chore. However, eating healthy meals and being active can help you find the physical and mental strength you’ll need. The good news is that small, simple changes can go a long way.

Get moving2

There are many simple activities you can do at home that can help improve your fitness, overall health as well as mental wellbeing. For example:2

  • Walking, gardening, housework, stretching, and even dancing or tai chi can be fun and new ways to include more movement in your daily lifestyle
  • To acquire substantial health benefits, adults need to accumulate 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week.
  • Adults can also combine vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity activities, with 1 minute of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity being equivalent to 2 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity.
  • For adults above 60 years of age, breaking up sedentary periods lasting longer than 90 minutes with 5 to 10 minutes of standing, moving around or doing some physical activity is recommended.

If you’re unsure, ask your doctor which activities are best for you. Start slow if you are not used to exercising.

 

Nutrition and recipes 3

Cancer can sometimes make it hard to enjoy foods that you used to love. However, nutrition is an important part of maintaining your weight and can help cope with treatment side effects. There are many steps you can take to give your body the nutrients and strength it needs.

Nutrition and Recipes

Food safety

Skip the alcohol

 

Coping with other health challenges

Cancer can bring many unexpected and challenging health problems, such as changes in taste, mouth sores, feeling sick to your stomach, and more. Here are some tips for dealing with these new challenges. 4

Dry mouth and mouth sores4

Changes in taste5

Trouble Swallowing 6

Nausea and throwing up7

Diarrhoea8

Constipation9

Appetite Loss10

Fatigue 1

References
1 Your Cancer Story. Physical Health. Retrieved October 2020 from https://www.yourcancerstory.com/physical-health/lung
2 National Physical Activity Guideline, Health Promotion Board Singapore. Retrieved on Nov 2020 from https://www.healthhub.sg/sites/assets/Assets/PDFs/HPB/PhysicalActivityPDFs/NPAG_Summary_Guide.pdf
3 Nutrition Recommendations During and After Treatment, Cancer.net. Retrieved on Nov 2020 from https://www.cancer.net/survivorship/healthy-living/nutrition-recommendations-during-and-after-treatment
4 Managing cancer-related side-effects: Mouth Sores and Pain. Cancer.org. Retrieved on November 2020 from https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/physical-side-effects/mouth-problems/mouth-sores.html
5 Managing physical side effects: Taste changes. Cancer.net. Retrieved on November 2020 from https://www.cancer.net/coping-with-cancer/physical-emotional-and-social-effects-cancer/managing-physical-side-effects/taste-changes
6 Managing cancer-related side-effects: Swallowing problems. Retrieved on November 2020 from https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/physical-side-effects/eating-problems/swallowing-problems.html
7 Managing cancer-related side effects: Managing nausea and vomiting. Retrieved on November 2020 from https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/physical-side-effects/nausea-and-vomiting/nausea-and-vomiting.html
8 Managing cancer-related side effects: Diarrhea. Retrieved on November 2020 from https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/physical-side-effects/stool-or-urine-changes/diarrhea.html
9 Managing cancer-related side effects. Managing bowel and bladder problem. Cancer.org. Retrieved on November 2020 from https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/physical-side-effects/stool-or-urine-changes/constipation.html
10 Managing cancer-related side effects: Eating problems. Retrieved on November 2020 from https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/physical-side-effects/eating-problems/poor-appetite.html